Associate Professor Jeannette Taylor from the University of Western Australia wins Sam Richardson Award

by Jul 22, 2021News, Research

Professor Peter Shergold AC announces the 2019 Sam Richardson Award winners

Associate Professor Jeannette Taylor
School of Social Sciences, Discipline of Political Science and International Relations
The University of Western Australia

The Institute of Public Administration Australia is pleased to announce that the 2020 Sam Richardson Award — for the most influential paper published in the Australian Journal of Public Administration in 2019 — has been awarded to Associate Professor Jeannette Taylor from the University of Western Australia.

Associate Professor Taylor’s award-winning paper ‘What causes employees to whistle while they work? Factors affecting internal whistle-blowing in the Australian Public Service’ was published in December 2019, and examines the impact of the nature of corruption, organisational culture, and employees’ work attitudes and actions on internal whistle-blowing in the APS.

Associate Professor Taylor’s paper was assessed by a judging panel that included leading public administration academics, representatives of the Institute of Public Administration Australia (IPAA), and young professionals from across the IPAA Divisions.

IPAA National President, Dr Gordon de Brouwer PSM, said that Associate Professor Taylor’s paper was original, innovative, topical and well-crafted.

‘It speaks to real life work problems for those in the public sector and is also an excellent, well-grounded paper with good empirical work and strong academic credentials.

The panel members were unanimous in their decision, believing that it makes an important scholarly contribution to theory as well as a practical contribution to public administration’.

Aashna Rampal, an Assistant Policy Officer with the NSW Department of Planning, Industry & Environment, was one of the members of the judging panel who assessed six short-listed papers for the Award and made the following observation of its universal value:

‘You don’t need to belong to the Australian Public Service or the public sector to be able to absorb the paper’s content, the data, the discussion and the evidence that’s backing it up.

Wherever you work culture is so important and its focus on culture is readily transferrable.’

It is expected that Associate Professor Taylor’s award-winning paper will have a significant and positive impact on public sector leaders and public servants across Australia.

Further information on the award, including past winners, is available from IPAA’s national website.